Depression Archives – Page 2 of 2 – A Healthy State of Mind

Micronutrients in Mental Health Series III Folic acid has been widely researched for the treatment of depression. In this post we will continue our Micronutrients in Mental Health Series, covering the 3rd nutrient implicated in depression and anemia with our discussion of folate. The name ‘folate’ is derived from the Latin ‘folium’ which means foliage, […]

May is National Physical Fitness and Sports month, and with the warmer days and more sun, it hopefully is easier for people to get motivated to move! Doctors have a tendency to overlook or understate the value of exercise in being busy to find the best treatment(s) for a patient’s ills, but the effects of […]

Antidepressant-induced hypomania or mania is defined as a short-term reaction to medication. This phenomenon, referred to as “switching”, occurs within 2 months of treatment initiation (if it occurs).1  Antidepressants can also cause long-term mood destabilization in bipolar treatment even in the absence of a short-term manic or bipolar switch.1,2  Properly diagnosing bipolar disorder is challenging […]

Circadian rhythm imbalances are at the root of Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.), a number of sleep disorders, jet lag, some cases of Attention Deficit /Hyperactivity Disorder and Shift Work Disorder (a circadian rhythm sleep disorder). (For more on how to address S.A.D, see my blog post  entitled ‘How to keep the Winter Blues at Bay‘. ) […]

Blog – Holistic Medicine for Stress,Trauma & Chronic Illness – Portland,OR

Well the time for spreading holiday cheer has come! To keep the holidays spirited and healthy, I thought that I would share some tips and counsel about how to indulge healthily this season (limiting the ill effects of alcohol and exploring bitters, verjus, non alcoholic mocktails). And in case you overdo it, I discuss the […]

Micronutrients in Mental Health Series III Folic acid has been widely researched for the treatment of depression. In this post we will continue our Micronutrients in Mental Health Series, covering the 3rd nutrient implicated in depression and anemia with our discussion of folate. The name ‘folate’ is derived from the Latin ‘folium’ which means foliage, […]

May is National Physical Fitness and Sports month, and with the warmer days and more sun, it hopefully is easier for people to get motivated to move! Doctors have a tendency to overlook or understate the value of exercise in being busy to find the best treatment(s) for a patient’s ills, but the effects of […]

Antidepressant-induced hypomania or mania is defined as a short-term reaction to medication. This phenomenon, referred to as “switching”, occurs within 2 months of treatment initiation (if it occurs).1  Antidepressants can also cause long-term mood destabilization in bipolar treatment even in the absence of a short-term manic or bipolar switch.1,2  Properly diagnosing bipolar disorder is challenging […]

Signs of spring are starting to show – with bulbs pushing through the soil and buds on trees forming. With the first day of spring still a few weeks away, now is the time to plan for a spring cleanse. Cleansing has been performed for centuries, but is perhaps all the more important in our […]

Circadian rhythm imbalances are at the root of Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.), a number of sleep disorders, jet lag, some cases of Attention Deficit /Hyperactivity Disorder and Shift Work Disorder (a circadian rhythm sleep disorder). (For more on how to address S.A.D, see my blog post  entitled ‘How to keep the Winter Blues at Bay‘. ) […]

Optimum Health Archives – A Healthy State of Mind

In this article I want to help you to get to know your heart. Knowing more about your heart (specifically your heart rate variability) can improve your awareness of how stressors impact your mind and body. To evaluate the health of your heart and nervous system, you just need a heart rate variability monitor (typically […]

This post is to update my current and future patients and readers that I recently attended a five-day intensive continuing medical education course offered by The Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM), located in Federal Way, Washington. Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice addresses one of the key issues in healthcare practice today – improving the […]

Environmental Medicine Series II Is your liquid soap contributing to bacterial resistance, ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), social impairment or metabolic problems? Is the ingredient that makes your shampoo lather contaminated with a carcinogenic compound? Or is the lotion that you use potentially affecting your hormones and fertility (i.e. it contains endocrine disruptors)?  The cosmetics […]

Have you ever gone to your doctor feeling that something was off, but testing revealed that ‘nothing’ was wrong? At least nothing according to conventional medical diagnosis of disease and interpretation of laboratory (lab) test results? In naturopathic and functional medicine, however, we are taught to order lab testing (along with an in-depth physical exam […]

With a New Year upon us, many are inclined to set resolutions for the year ahead – many of which relate to health. To ensure that your goals (health or otherwise) are more realistic and successful, I wanted to share with you about ‘SMART’ goals. The goal setting tools that it provides, coupled with the […]

Have often have you heard, if you eat a balanced diet, you will obtain all of the nutrients that you need? But what is a balanced diet? And in an age where our food quality is often poorer than that of our ancestors due to loss of nutrients with shipping and storage, modern agricultural practices […]

I was interviewed for the article posted below in conjunction with teaching a Nutrition-Focused Physical Exam class for Doctoral Nutrition Students at Maryland University of Integrative Health. I will share more of my teaching work in a future post/website update. For now I will leave you with this article – I hope that you find […]

Environmental Medicine Series III As the Environmental Medicine blog series draws to a close, we are working our way from toxins found outside our bodies to those that are found inside. A main route of entry to ingested toxins is through the food and water we consume. As our environment and food supply have become […]

‘Sensitivity’ can be a loaded term in our culture and has a number of connotations, many not very positive. Elaine Aron, Ph.D., author of The Highly Sensitive Person book, defines a sensitive person as one who is aware of subtleties in their surroundings, more readily overwhelmed after being in a stimulating environment for too long […]

Naturopathic Mental Health Blog| Psychology & Psychiatry | A Healthy State of Mind

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Friday, July 26, 2013

In last month’s blog post on iron’s role in mental (and physical) health, we covered one of a trio of ferromagnetic metals found in nature. Cobalt is another such metal that has a prominent role in our mental (and physical) health. Cobalt is seldom found in its free form, needing to exist in compounds with…> read more

Categories: Anxiety Disorders, Depression, Diet & Nutrition, Schizophrenia & Psychosis, Supplements Tags: celiac disease, Cyanocobalamin, memory, nutrient deficiencies, vegan, vegetarian, Vitamin B12, vitamins

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Tuesday, June 18, 2013

In the coming months, I will be covering different vitamins and minerals and their role in mental (and physical) health.  In mental health I think that the role of optimal nutrition is often overlooked. This blog series Naturopathic Mental Health Blog| Psychology & Psychiatry | A Healthy State of Mind aims to change that and to offer you a glimpse into homeopathic forms of…> read more

Categories: Depression, Diet & Nutrition, Homeopathy, Psychiatry, Supplements Tags: Anemia, Dysthymia, Hormonal imbalances, Iron-deficiency Anemia

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Monday, May 27, 2013

This tome of psychiatry has evolved to become a more complex categorization of mental illness than ever before. The scope and perspectives of individual practitioners, including many naturopathic physicians, psychiatric mental health practitioners, psychiatrists, psychologists and other mental health care providers, remain much broader and more inclusive in their approach than the new Diagnostic & Statistical…> read more

Categories: Psychiatry, Psychology Tags: DSM-5

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Monday, May 27, 2013

Spring is the time to tonify and care for the liver. In Chinese Medicine, the spring is the season of the liver and gallbladder. It is a time to eat simple, light and fresh fare to give our liver and our spirits a chance to renew themselves after the heavier, richer foods of winter. Young,…> read more

Categories: Depression, Digestion & Gastrointestinal Health Tags: Alcohol, Cholesterol, detoxification, drugs, emotions, Hormonal imbalances, Irritability, medications, Mood, vegetables

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Thursday, February 7, 2013

Circadian rhythm imbalances are at the root of Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.), a number of sleep disorders, jet lag, some cases of Attention Deficit /Hyperactivity Disorder and Shift Work Disorder. (For more on how to address S.A.D, see the October 2012 blog post  ‘How to keep the Winter Blues at Bay”. ) It is estimated that…> read more

Categories: Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Tags: Chronotherapy, Chronotype, insomnia, Light therapy, MEQ, Shift Work Disorder- SWD

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Thursday, December 20, 2012

Well the time for spreading holiday cheer has come! To keep the holidays spirited and healthy, I thought that I would share some tips and counsel about how to indulge healthily. I began this blog posting hoping to cover a number of topics (digestion tips, ways of dealing with holiday stressors, etc.), but alas, with…> read more

Categories: Diet & Nutrition, Digestion & Gastrointestinal Health, Herbal Medicine, Homeopathy Tags: Alcohol, Bitters, Cardiovascular, Cholesterol, hangover, holidays, liver, New Year resolutions, Verjus

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Monday, October 15, 2012

Seasonal changes are known to affect those suffering from a number of psychiatric complaints. Seasonal affective disorder (S.A.D.) is the most common diagnosis for those suffering from seasonal changes. S.A.D. affects about 6% of the U.S. population. A milder form of S.A.D., known as the Winter Blues or Subsyndromal S.A.D.,  affects approximately 14 % of…> read more

Categories: Bipolar Disorder, Circadian Rhythms, Depression, Sleep Tags: Chronotherapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dawn Simulator, Light Box, Light therapy, Mood, mood log, Sex drive, Sleep restriction, Weight gain, winter blues

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Friday, September 28, 2012

As the Environmental Medicine blog series draws to a close, we are working our way from toxins found outside our bodies to those that are found inside. A main route of entry to ingested toxins is through the food and water we consume. As our environment and food supply have become increasingly complex and modernized,…> read more

Categories: Diet & Nutrition, Environmental Medicine Tags: body burden, BPA, detoxification, environmental medicine, GMO, Heavy Metals, Hormonal imbalances, liver health, organic

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Friday, August 31, 2012

Is your liquid soap contributing to bacterial resistance, ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), social impairment or metabolic problems? Is the ingredient that makes your shampoo lather contaminated with a carcinogenic compound? Or is the lotion that you use potentially affecting your hormones and fertility?  The personal care products industry is a large and ever-growing enterprise…> read more

Categories: ADD/ADHD, Environmental Medicine Tags: Behavior, Dirty Dozen, Endocrine Disruptors, environmental medicine, Fertility, Heavy Metals, Hormonal imbalances, Neurotoxicity, Thyroid

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Thursday, July 12, 2012

Well if you haven’t yet got to that spring cleaning or are working on home improvement projects this summer, now is your chance to clean for your health and for that of your family and pets! Toxins can be found in a wide array of household products, furnishings and equipment and contribute to a myriad…> read more

Categories: Environmental Medicine Tags: ADHD, environmental medicine, EPA, EWG, Heavy Metals, HEPA, neuropsychiatric

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Is Shift Work Affecting your Mental Health? | A Healthy State of Mind

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Thursday, February 7, 2013

Circadian rhythm imbalances are at the root of Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.), a number of sleep disorders, jet lag, some cases of Attention Deficit /Hyperactivity Disorder and Shift Work Disorder. (For more on how to address S.A.D, see the October 2012 blog post  ‘How to keep the Winter Blues at Bay”. ) It is estimated that approximately 22 million Americans classify as shift workers. Shift workers, (which includes those who work nights, early mornings and swing shifts), are more likely to have impaired work performance and increased work absences than those working day shifts. Night/rotating shift workers are 2-4 times more likely than daytime workers to fall asleep while driving.

Not all shift workers will suffer from Shift Work Disorder (SWD), but it is critical that early detection and treatment be employed for those suffering from SWD.  Shift Work Disorder (SWD) is a condition that is associated with chronic partial sleep loss and misalignment of the circadian rhythm. SWD is characterized by insomnia, daytime sleepiness and decreased quality and duration of sleep. Sleep is critical to proper detoxification, neuroendocrine function (neurological and hormonal regulation) and blood glucose regulation. Thus chronic partial sleep loss can lead to a number of adverse effects: increased risk of mood disorders (depression and bipolar), anxiety disorders, substance dependence, hypertension (high blood pressure), ulcers, heart disease, obesity, diabetes cancer, musculoskeletal pain, gastrointestinal complaints and decreased fertility. Memory consolidation, alertness and learning capacity are decreased.  Those suffering from SWD also miss more family and social events as their different sleep schedule tends to interfere with these events and can disrupt relationships.

Genetics and chronotype play a role in determining whether an individual subjected to shift work will suffer from Shift Work Disorder. Those with a predisposition to insomnia generally do not adapt well to shift work and are at an increased risk of developing SWD. Morning types are more likely to suffer from SWD than evening types. Further, chronotypes can be useful in determining what shift work one is more suited to. Evening types will adapt better to evening and night shifts, whereas morning types will generally adapt better to working early morning shifts. To determine one’s chronotype, the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) is very helpful. Click here for an auto-scored version.

As those suffering from shift work disorder are at an increased risk of mental illness, substance dependence, sleep disorders and physical illness, proper diagnosis and treatment of SWD is imperative.  Treatment includes chronotherapeutic interventions, sleep hygiene education and the select use of sedative medications (naturopathic/pharmaceutical as appropriate).

Chronotherapeutic interventions include the use of short naps, amber glasses, regularity of sleep-wake cycle, low-dose melatonin and light therapy. Short naps (taken prior to or during a night shift) can increase alertness, improve reaction time and decrease accidents. Amber glasses, worn when working nights and/or on the drive home, can minimize the adverse effects of bright light exposure during the night. Low-dose melatonin can help one adapt to a new sleep-wake cycle – cuing the body that it is night- whether in rotating shift work, a new shift schedule, or when suffering from a skewed sleep-wake cycle (consistently waking too early or not being able to get to sleep at ‘night’. Light treatment can be used to help sync the circadian rhythm as well (advancing it if light is administered after waking & delaying it if light treatment is administered prior to bed).

To improve sleep quality, be sure to have a dark bedroom (use curtains or blinds that block out all light) and keep loud noises to a minimum (also consider wearing ear plugs and/or using a white noise machine). Avoid caffeine, alcohol, smoking and large meals before bed. See my December 2011 blog post to read more sleep hygiene tips and other helpful information on sleep. Deserving of a whole blog post of its own, sleep apnea is a very prevalent sleep disorder that is important to rule out as a cause of insomnia. Sleep studies are important in accurately diagnosing sleep apnea.

Some final tips: for those working rotating shifts, shifts that rotate counterclockwise are easier for the body to adapt to than clockwise-rotating shifts. To ensure better sleep-wake cycles and improved sleep quality, it is important to maintain the same sleep and wake times throughout the week (even on days off) and to follow good sleep hygiene tips (not eating right before bed, limiting caffeine prior to sleeping and keeping stimulation to a minimum prior to bed). Shift work can be a challenge for many to maintain, but I hope that this helps you or someone you care about better sustain aberrant work schedules and to enjoy greater health as a result!

If you would like to be notified of when a new blog entry is posted and/or would like to receive the clinic’s quarterly newsletter, be sure to sign up!

References:

Doghramji, K., Lenz, T.L. & Markov, D. (2011). Advances in the Management of Shift-Work Disorder. US Pharmacist, Dec., 1-32.

Wirz-Justice, A., Benedetti, F. & Terman, M. (2009). Chronotherapeutics for Affective Disorders. Basel: Karger.

Categories: Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Tags: Chronotherapy, Chronotype, insomnia, Light therapy, MEQ, Shift Work Disorder- SWD

Neurotoxins, Carcinogens & Toxins in Personal Care Products | A Healthy State of Mind

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Friday, August 31, 2012

Is your liquid soap contributing to bacterial resistance, ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), social impairment or metabolic problems? Is the ingredient that makes your shampoo lather contaminated with a carcinogenic compound? Or is the lotion that you use potentially affecting your hormones and fertility?  The personal care products industry is a large and ever-growing enterprise with labeling and regulations that are arguably insufficient. Unfortunately many people are unaware of the potential adverse health effects of products that they use every day and may be suffering as a result…

With a little knowledge and some helpful resources, you can become a more educated and healthy consumer. Before we jump into the chemical soup, a helpful principle deserves mention: The Precautionary Principle. This principle advocates a cautious approach when considering adopting a new chemical or product for human use. You can apply this yourself if you find an ingredient in a product that you do not recognize or are concerned about- if in doubt, opt out! There are lots of safe products on the market to choose from.

Particular caution should be exercised in using new skin products if you have a history of eczema, contact dermatitis or other skin complaints.

So let’s review some of the leading chemicals found in personal care products such as soap, shampoo, conditioners, lotion, sunscreens, make-up, nail polish/products, hair products and dyes:

Phthalates– I spoke of these in my last blog post with regards to their presence in the home. This class of chemicals is also ubiquitous in personal care products. It can be found in cosmetics, perfume, nail polish & products, liquid soap, hairspray and also in medical tubing and IV (intravenous) bags. Phthalates can interfere with reproductive health, fat and carbohydrate metabolism and can contribute to cancer, allergies, asthma, obesity, insulin resistance and neurodevelopmental disorders (ADHD, social impairment in kids).

Parabens are preservatives that are widely used in cosmetics and other personal care products to prevent microbial growth. They have been shown to possess endocrine disruptor activity. (Chemicals with this distinction interfere with normal hormonal function and can cause developmental, behavioral and fertility issues. Chemicals with endocrine disruptive activity can interact with receptors for neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine (which are important in regulating mood, behavior and hormonal function).)  Phthalates  have been detected in human blood, breast and placenta. On labels, this class of chemicals may be listed as ‘methylparaben’, ‘butylparaben’ or ‘propyl paraben’.

Perfumes– from those you apply directly to your skin, to the wafting of perfume from magazine strips, perfume is all around us and can cause a host of problems. There are at least 3,000 chemicals used as fragrances and on labels they may simply be listed as ‘parfum’ or ‘fragrance’. No further disclosure of their ingredients on labels is required. Musk xylene and musk ketone are common chemical bases for perfume scents and have been linked to PMS (Premenstrual Syndrome), disruptions in the estrogen:progesterone balance, decreased ovarian function and infertility. Other chemicals in perfume have been linked to cancers and neurotoxicity.

Triclosan is an antimicrobial used in hand sanitizing products and in antibacterial soaps. This chemical is a known endocrine disruptor- linked to thyroid and reproductive issues. Its frequent use may also lead antibiotic resistance to bacteria. Cleaning your hands thoroughly with soap and water is just as effective as antimicrobial soap (and safer)!

Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) is a foaming agent used in shampoos, shower gels and cleansers. It is an irritant to the skin and eyes and may be contaminated with 1,4-dioxane (which we will discuss in a moment).

1,4- dioxane is a carcinogenic (cancer-causing) chemical that is not required to be disclosed on a label. USDA Organic products do not contain this chemical.

DEA (diethanolamine) and related compounds can be found in soaps, shampoos and cleansers (added as a foaming agent or to adjust the pH of the product). These compounds cause skin and eye irritation, precancerous changes in the skin and thyroid and cancerous changes in the liver (in laboratory experiments). DEA compounds can react with other chemicals in cosmetics to form carcinogenic nitrosamine compounds.

Lead can be found in lipstick and hair dyes. The FDA claims that concern over lead in lipstick is unwarranted, while others in this Washington Post article question this point of view. As discussed in last month’s blog, “excess levels of lead in the body can lead to autism, ADHD, developmental disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms, cancer, reproductive health issues and other conditions. It is particularly problematic for young children, leading to behavioral problems, lower IQ scores and learning difficulties.”

Nanotechnology is an emerging technology in which tiny molecules are used in medicine for targeted drug delivery and imaging purposes. In the cosmetics industry, nanoparticles can be found in sunscreen and cosmetics. There are concerns about the possible consequences of these particles, but no hard evidence about their effects in humans just yet.

Oxybenzone, Methoxycinnamate are endocrine disruptors found in sunscreen. Choosing sunscreens with titanium dioxide or zinc oxide is a safer bet.

PERC (perchloroethylene), also known as tetrachloroethylene, is used in dry cleaning. This chemical is neurotoxic and is a suspected carcinogen. Opt for ‘green dry cleaning’ or hand wash instead.

Petrochemicals are petroleum based compounds such as petrolatum, mineral oil and paraffin. These compounds prevent the skin from breathing properly and can be contaminated with PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) which can cause (when exposure occurs prenatally) low birth weight, premature delivery, heart malformations, decreased IQ and childhood asthma. PAHs are also associated with cancer.

Coal Tar is present in synthetic colors and will appear on labels as ‘FD & C’ or ‘D & C’. These compounds can contain heavy metal salts with can be carcinogenic.

Ureas are preservatives that release formaldehyde (a known human carcinogen). These chemicals can also cause contact dermatitis. This class of compounds may appear on labels as ‘diazolidinyl urea’, imidazolidinyl urea, hydantoin, DMDM, sodium hydroxymethlyglycinate methaenamine, and quaternium-15.

Formaldehyde is also found in nail hardening products.

BHA & BHT ( butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene respectively) are preservatives which possess possible endocrine disruptor activity and carcinogenic effects.

PEGs (polyethylene glycols) are used as cream bases, thickeners and solvents for a wide variety of personal care products. PEGs may be contaminated with 1,4-dioxane and show some evidence of genotoxicity. PEGs also increase the permeability of the skin and can thus increase absorption of other, potentially harmful, constituents in a product. Propylene glycol is a related chemical that is best avoided.

Siloxanes are another class of endocrine disruptor chemicals that can be found in hair products, deodorants, moisturizers and facial products. This class of chemicals includes ‘cyclotetrasiloxane’, ‘cyclopentasiloxane’, ‘cycloshexasiloxane’, and ‘cyclomethicone’.

Resorcinol, a compound in hair coloring and bleaching products, can cause allergies, is potentially toxic to the immune system and can disrupt thyroid function.

Retinyl Palmitate, a vitamin A containing compound, when applied to skin in the presence of sunlight, can speed the development of skin tumors and lesions.

So now that you re armed with greater knowledge on some of the leading compounds to avoid in personal care products, how do you find what is safe to use? There are a number of helpful resources and guides to consult (see below). And remember the Precautionary Principle…when in doubt, opt out! Taking care of your overall health will bring greater beauty and health to your skin, hair and nails than most products could ever impart!

Please check my blog again soon for more on reducing one’s exposure to harmful chemicals in food and beverages and for ways that you can assess your body burden and risk of toxicity. If you aren’t on my email list, sign up to be emailed once the next blog post is ready and to receive future posts and news. If you know of others who might benefit from this information, please forward it on to them by sending them the link (https://ahealthystateofmind.com/the-price-we-pay-for-beauty/) and inviting them to sign up. Thanks for reading!

Resources:

For a handy pocket guide or app on The Dirty Dozen – Cosmetic Chemicals to Avoid, click here.

To determine the safety of your personal care products, visit the EWG (Environmental Working Group) Cosmetics Database, ‘Skin Deep’ where you can look up over 75, 000 products and get helpful tips and credible information.

The following video:  ‘The Story of Cosmetics’ provides a helpful overview of what was covered in this blog.

The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics has a host of helpful news and resources  on its site: http://safecosmetics.org/

Nanotechnology Consumer Products Inventory provides an inventory of nanotechnology-based products currently on the market: http://www.nanotechproject.org/inventories/consumer/

References:

Crinnon, W. (2010). Clean, Green & Lean. Get Rid of the Toxins That Make You Fat. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Suzuki, D. (2010, Oct.). Backgrounder. The “Dirty Dozen” Ingredients Investigated in the David Suzuki Foundation Survey of Chemicals Used in Cosmetics. Retrieved from http://www.davidsuzuki.org/issues/downloads/Dirty-dozen-backgrounder.pdf

University of Arizona Integrative Medicine Continuing Education. (2012). Environmental Medicine: An Integrative Approach. Retrieved from http://integrativemedicine.arizona.edu/education/online_courses/enviro-med.html

Categories: ADD/ADHD, Environmental Medicine Tags: Behavior, Dirty Dozen, Endocrine Disruptors, environmental medicine, Fertility, Heavy Metals, Hormonal imbalances, Neurotoxicity, Thyroid