Relationship & Healing

Well it is hard to not notice the collective stir around love & relationship in February and it prompted me to reflect on the power of relationship to heal. This power is undoubtedly important in any healing dynamic (doctor-patient relationship), but as Dr. Heron so aptly states, perhaps even more so when one suffers from emotional and psychological/psychiatric distress:

“I can easily imagine giving a patient a good (homeopathic) remedy for eczema and placing them on a deserted island fully expecting them to get better. But I do not imagine this to be true of the patient who is suffering from depression or from a compulsive disorder. These patients need to be in relationship, they need the relational field to heal.” 1

In my practice, I place great value on the relationship that I have and foster with my patients, for without a connected, trusting and caring relationship, healing does not occur, no matter how powerful the medicine. I have observed homeopathic treatments to heal through relationship. I see remedies as restoring one’s relationship to oneself and to the external world on multiple levels.  In so doing, it changes one’s relationship to one’s ailment. Time and again I have seen someone debilitated by a condition, let’s use a case of eczema as an example. The individual is prescribed a single homeopathic remedy and  when they return for a follow-up soon after taking the remedy and are asked how their skin is, though it does not yet look any different, they report that it no longer bothers them?! And then I know that a more complete shift and resolution of their symptoms will soon follow as their relationship to their symptoms has changed and the healing process has begun.

This brings us to a brief examination of illness. Arguably there are pathogenic organisms that afflict us, but many would contend that it is the terrain versus the germ that determines what and if we are affected by an organism or condition.

Florence Nightingale “There are no specific diseases; there are specific disease conditions.” 

William Osler “It is much more important to know what sort of a patient has a disease than what sort of a disease a patient has.”

I tend to agree with this viewpoint in most cases and link this back to relationship. It is the harmonious relationship between our bodily systems, our mind and our environment that determines health from a naturopathic perspective. When these systems are in right relationship, health is to be had. When these systems are imbalanced, symptoms appear, and ultimately more severe conditions manifest if the imbalances are not addressed.

So what does the modern medical literature have to contribute to this discussion? Evidence comes from studies on the efficacy of psychotherapy and from studies on the placebo effect. Compelling evidence on the efficacy of psychotherapy can be found in a 2010 article by Jonathan Schedler, entitled “The Efficacy of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy”, in which an in-depth review of the literature in the field is presented. Schedler speaks to the importance of the psychotherapeutic relationship:

“The relationship between therapist and patient is itself an important interpersonal relationship, one that can become deeply meaningful and emotionally charged….The recurrence of interpersonal themes in the therapy relationship (in theoretical terms, transference and countertransference) provides a unique opportunity to explore and rework them in vivo. The goal is greater flexibility in interpersonal relationships and an enhanced capacity to meet interpersonal needs.”2

The placebo effect has been widely studied and can be summarized very simply as the effects of treatment that cannot be attributed to the medicine itself. The placebo effect can thus be considered the effect that results from the doctor-patient relationship and the patient’s expectation/hope/belief that the treatment will be helpful.  A recent 60 minutes episode interviewing psychologist Irving Kirsch, the associate director of the Placebo Studies Program at Harvard Medical School, says that his research challenges the effectiveness of antidepressants (especially for mild-moderate depression). You can view his interview at: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7399362n 3 .

Finally to extend this discussion a little farther, the relationship of medicine needs to heal. Our current state of affairs is a fragmented system which often leaves practitioners and patients unsatisfied and unwell. I feel that greater collaboration and integration could bring some healing into the medical sphere.

If you would like to be notified of future blog posts by email and would like to receive our e-newsletter, sign-up here.

References:

1 Heron, K. (2012). Expectations. Simillimum. Journal of the homeopathic academy of naturopathic physicians, 2011/2012(XXIV), 43-45.

2 Schedler, J. (2011). The Efficacy of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. E-Journal of American Psychologist, 65(2), 98-109. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/amp-65-2-98.pdf

3 Stahl, Leslie. (2012, Feb 19.) .Treating Depression: Is there a Placebo Effect. [Interview of Irving Kirsch, PhD. on 60 minutes]. Retrieved from http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7399362n

Categories: Anxiety Disorders, Depression, Homeopathy, Psychiatric Medications, PsychologyTags: Antidepressants, emotions, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (O.C.D.), placebo, Psychotherapy, relationship

Sensitivity, HSPs & Homeopathy

‘Sensitivity’ can be a loaded term in our culture and has a number of connotations, many not very positive. Elaine Aron, Ph.D., author of The Highly Sensitive Person book, defines a sensitive person as one who is aware of subtleties in their surroundings, more readily overwhelmed after being in a stimulating environment for too long and possessing a number of other traits; such as being more cautious, needing more downtime, being more sensitive to pain, more sensitive to caffeine and more sensitive to medications. In addition, those who are more sensitive (or Highly Sensitive Persons (HSPs)) tend to be prone to being easily startled and are aggravated by loud noises and bright lights. HSPs also tend to need more sleep than those without this trait.  Dr. Aron’s extensive research has established that about 15-20 percent of the population is highly sensitive and it is a trait that tends to be inherited. HSPs are often diagnosed with psychosomatic symptoms and tend to respond well to homeopathic remedies.

Lest I give the impression that those who are highly sensitive have it all bad (or that others around them suffer as a result of their sensitivity), let me share with you some of the benefits of being an HSP. Those who are highly sensitive tend to be very creative, empathic, insightful, conscientious, reflective and detail-oriented. They are often aware of subtleties in their surroundings that go completely unnoticed by those without this trait; subtleties that may be clues to changes in their health and well-being or the well-being of those around them.

HSPs often have a history of frustrating encounters with medical professionals as they can detect subtle changes in sensation and functioning of their bodies, which the Western medical paradigm is ill-adapted to address. Thus when symptoms have no known cause or diagnosis, patients end out going through a number of tests and medical visits to no avail and may be labeled ‘neurotic’ or told that their condition is ‘psychosomatic’.

Here is where naturopathic and homeopathic care can lend a hand. Those who are highly sensitive tend to respond well to more subtle herbal, nutritional and homeopathic treatments that nourish their nervous systems and gently rebalance the functioning of their body and mind. Dr. Aron states that HSPs tend to have a harder time working mixed shifts or night shifts and recover more slowly from jet lag. Thus it can be said that HSPs also likely have more vulnerable circadian rhythms and could benefit from counsel and support in this area (chronotherapy).

I have greatly enjoyed working with a number of individuals who could be classified as highly sensitive in my practice. I find that in-depth, time-intensive and supportive care (including homeopathy, flower essences and other naturopathic modalities) can be very healing for HSPs. Naturopathic medicine, particularly homeopathy, pays careful attention to the subtle signs, symptoms and observations that patients experience and express. There are over 2,000 homeopathic remedies, many of which can be helpful for HSPs. Below I will share the picture of Phosphorus, a remedy that depicts Dr. Aron’s description of an HSP to a ‘T’:

Phosphorus, a mineral remedy can help someone who fits the following remedy picture: one who is highly impressionable, sensitive to external impressions (light, noise), easily startled, drained from too much social contact, possessing quick perceptions and prone to anxiety and fears (often felt in the pit of the stomach). Phosphorus types are sympathetic to the suffering of others to the point where they may actually feel other people’s pain. They tend to be artistic, creative and imaginative and have strong intense relationships. They generally feel better in the morning, better from sleep and worse from missing a meal and from coffee. There are a number of mental-emotional and physical symptoms which this remedy can effectively treat: anxiety and fears, colds which settle in the chest, a tendency to bleed easily, vertigo, diarrhea and vomiting… Early on, one needing Phosphorus may suffer from fatigue and concerns about their health that can seem out of proportion to their health problem. Later, indifference, apathy and dullness can set in and one can become more withdrawn.

It is beyond the scope of this article to discuss how remedies are selected, prescribed and act to effect healing, but a brief caveat: even the most astute homeopath is limited in prescribing a remedy for their own chronic condition. If you are suffering from a chronic condition and are interested in homeopathy, please seek the care of a qualified naturopath or homeopath and do not self-prescribe!

For a more detailed discussion of the HSP trait, research and case studies on HSPs, the merits and drawbacks of medication for HSPs, psychotherapeutic support and a number of helpful resources and tips, I highly recommend reading Dr. Aron’s The Highly Sensitive Person book and film, ‘Sensitive: The Movie’. You may also like to do a brief self-test to see if you are potentially an HSP, you will may find this test on Dr. Aron’s website, along with newsletter archives and a number of other resources posted there, to be helpful. I am listed there as an HSP-knowledgeable practitioner.

If you are an HSP, I hope that you can find the support that you need to flourish! And if you are not an HSP, perhaps you have learned something of value to help someone you know, or just to understand HSPs and homeopathy a little more…

If you would like to be notified of future blog posts by email and would like to receive our e-newsletter, sign-up here.

References:

Aron, E. (1996 ). The Highly Sensitive Person. How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You. New York, NY: Broadway Books.

Aron, E. (1996 ). The Highly Sensitive Person. Self-Test. Retrieved from http://www.hsperson.com/pages/test.htm

Elmore, D. (2000). Phosphorus handout (from Vithoulkas, Shore, Kent, Whitmont, Cowperthwaite, Gibson & Nash). Portland, OR: National College of Natural Medicine.

Categories: Anxiety Disorders, Circadian Rhythms, Homeopathy, Psychology Tags: Behavior, Homeopathy, HSP, Psychotherapy

Circadian Rhythms in the News – Light Therapy for Bipolar Depression & Apps to help with sleep

With more use of devices and longer, darker nights, our circadian rhythms are more vulnerable. Those suffering from bipolar disorder, insomnia or sleep disorders and those who work shifts (shift work disorder) are some of the most affected. Here are a couple of interesting and relevant articles from the news this week:

If you are interested in reading more about Circadian Rhythms and how to optimize yours, see the following blog posts:

and article:

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Mary Fry, ND completed a National Institute of Health post-doctorate in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. She is an Associate Professor in the Nutrition & Integrative Health Department at Maryland University of Integrative Health, lectures and writes on topics of Nutrition, Naturopathic and Functional Medicine and practices in Oregon.

Gut Feelings

Recent evidence suggests that the status of our gastrointestinal (gut) flora may affect mood and behavior. This evidence, derived from a study conducted by Bravo et al. and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that bacteria in the gut can communicate with the brain and vice-versa via the vagus nerve1. (The vagus nerve transmits signals between the gastrointestinal system and the brain (providing physiologic evidence for a gut-brain or gut-mind connection).).

The study examined 2 groups of mice who were fed either a diet containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus (a beneficial bacteria found in dairy products and many probiotic supplements) or a diet without this bacteria. Emotional and mood states of each group of mice were evaluated and it was found that the mice fed the diet with L. rhamnosus generally responded to tests in such a way that suggested improved mood and decreased anxiety than the group of mice fed a diet without probiotics. In addition, the L. rhamnosus-fed mice exhibited lower levels of corticosterone than the mice fed a diet without probiotic organisms. (Corticosterone is a hormone secreted in response to stress.) Furthermore, all of these differences disappeared when the vagus nerves of the mice in both groups were cut, suggesting that the effects were mediated by gut-brain communication.

While the above study was conducted on animals and the results are not directly translatable to humans, evidence from other studies suggest reason to pursue this research further.

  • There is evidence that probiotics (and prebiotics) can improve mood and decrease anxiety in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome.2,3
  • Epidemiological evidence has identified an association between neurodevelopmental disorders (such as schizophrenia) and microbial pathogen infections during the perinatal period.4
  • Colonization of the gut with beneficial microbes can impact brain development and subsequent adult behavior (according to another recently published study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences5).

Thus it seems all the more important to consider not only treating the brain and nervous system in those suffering from mental-emotional distress, but also to focus on gastrointestinal health. No wonder so many herbs and natural remedies that are of benefit to the nervous system are also of benefit to the gastrointestinal system—the health of each system may be more interdependent than modern medicine has heretofore appreciated.

If you would like to be notified of future blog posts by email and would like to receive our e-newsletter, sign-up here.

References:

1Bravo JA,  Forsythe P, Chew MV,  et al. (2011) Ingestion of Lactobacillus strain regulates emotional behavior and central GABA receptor expression in a mouse via the vagus nerve. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:16050-55.

2Rao AV, Bested AC, Beaulne TM, et al. (2009) A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of a probiotic in emotional symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome. Gut Pathog 1:6.

3Silk DB, Davis A, Vulevic J, et al. (2009) Clinical trial: The effects of a trans-galactooligosaccharide prebiotic on faecal microbiota and symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 29:508-18.

4Mittal VA, Ellman LM, Cannon TD (2008) Gene-environment interaction and covariation in schizophrenia: The role of obstetric complications. Schizophr Bull 34:1083-1094.

5Heijitz RD, Wang S, Anuar F, et al. (2011) Normal gut microbiota modulates brain development and behavior. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:3047-3052.

The Economist, 400(8749), 80-81.

Psychology, Homeopathy, Relationship & Healing | A Healthy State of Mind

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Well it is hard to not notice the collective stir around love & relationship in February and it prompted me to reflect on the power of relationship to heal. This power is undoubtedly important in any healing dynamic, but as Dr. Heron so aptly states, perhaps even more so when one suffers from emotional and psychological/psychiatric distress:

“I can easily imagine giving a patient a good (homeopathic) remedy for eczema and placing them on a deserted island fully expecting them to get better. But I do not imagine this to be true of the patient who is suffering from depression or from a compulsive disorder. These patients need to be in relationship, they need the relational field to heal.” 1

In my practice, I place great value on the relationship that I have and foster with my patients, for without a connected, trusting and caring relationship, healing does not occur, no matter how powerful the medicine. I have observed homeopathy to heal through relationship. I see remedies as restoring one’s relationship to oneself and to the external world on multiple levels.  In so doing, it changes one’s relationship to one’s ailment. Time and again I have seen someone debilitated by a condition, let’s use a case of eczema as an example. The individual is prescribed a single homeopathic remedy and  when they return for a follow-up soon after taking the remedy and are asked how their skin is, though it does not yet look any different, they report that it no longer bothers them?! And then I know that a more complete shift and resolution of their symptoms will soon follow as their relationship to their symptoms has changed and the healing process has begun.

This brings us to a brief examination of illness. Arguably there are pathogenic organisms that afflict us, but many would contend that it is the terrain versus the germ that determines what and if we are affected by an organism or condition.

Florence Nightingale “There are no specific diseases; there are specific disease conditions.” 

William Osler “It is much more important to know what sort of a patient has a disease than what sort of a disease a patient has.”

I tend to agree with this viewpoint in most cases and link this back to relationship. It is the harmonious relationship between our bodily systems, our mind and our environment that determines health from a naturopathic perspective. When these systems are in right relationship, health is to be had. When these systems are imbalanced, symptoms appear, and ultimately more severe conditions manifest if the imbalances are not addressed.

So what does the modern medical literature have to contribute to this discussion? Evidence comes from studies on the efficacy of psychotherapy and from studies on the placebo effect. Compelling evidence on the efficacy of psychotherapy can be found in a 2010 article by Jonathan Schedler, entitled “The Efficacy of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy”, in which an in-depth review of the literature in the field is presented. Schedler speaks to the importance of the psychotherapeutic relationship:

“The relationship between therapist and patient is itself an important interpersonal relationship, one that can become deeply meaningful and emotionally charged….The recurrence of interpersonal themes in the therapy relationship (in theoretical terms, transference and countertransference) provides a unique opportunity to explore and rework them in vivo. The goal is greater flexibility in interpersonal relationships and an enhanced capacity to meet interpersonal needs.”2

The placebo effect has been widely studied and can be summarized very simply as the effects of treatment that cannot be attributed to the medicine itself. The placebo effect can thus be considered the effect that results from the doctor-patient relationship and the patient’s expectation/hope/belief that the treatment will be helpful.  A recent 60 minutes episode interviewing psychologist Irving Kirsch, the associate director of the Placebo Studies Program at Harvard Medical School, says that his research challenges the effectiveness of antidepressants (especially for mild-moderate depression). You can view his interview at: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7399362n 3 .

Finally to extend this discussion a little farther, the relationship of medicine needs to heal. Our current state of affairs is a fragmented system which often leaves practitioners and patients unsatisfied and unwell. I feel that greater collaboration and integration could bring some healing into the medical sphere. This spring I hope to present a case which illustrates the healing potential of integrative care. This was a case in which I collaborated with a psychiatric colleague in treating a case of alcoholism, obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression using a combination of homeopathy, nutrition, herbal medicine, psychotherapy and antidepressants with good long-term results. More to follow…

If you would like to be notified of future blog posts by email and would like to receive our e-newsletter, sign-up here.

References:

1 Heron, K. (2012). Expectations. Simillimum. Journal of the homeopathic academy of naturopathic physicians, 2011/2012(XXIV), 43-45.

2 Schedler, J. (2011). The Efficacy of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. E-Journal of American Psychologist, 65(2), 98-109. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/amp-65-2-98.pdf

3 Stahl, Leslie. (2012, Feb 19.) .Treating Depression: Is there a Placebo Effect. [Interview of Irving Kirsch, PhD. on 60 minutes]. Retrieved from http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7399362n

Categories: Anxiety Disorders, Depression, Homeopathy, Psychiatric Medications, Psychology Tags: Antidepressants, emotions, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (O.C.D.), placebo, Psychotherapy, relationship

Your Nervous System: Friend or Foe? HSPs & Homeopathy | A Healthy State of Mind

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Saturday, May 26, 2012

‘Sensitivity’ can be a loaded term in our culture and has a number of connotations, many not very positive. Elaine Aron, Ph.D., author of The Highly Sensitive Person, defines a sensitive person as one who is aware of subtleties in their surroundings, more readily overwhelmed after being in a stimulating environment for too long and possessing a number of other traits; such as being more cautious, needing more downtime, being more sensitive to pain, more sensitive to caffeine and more sensitive to medications. In addition, those who are more sensitive (or Highly Sensitive Persons (HSPs)) tend to be prone to being easily startled and are aggravated by loud noises and bright lights. HSPs also tend to need more sleep than those without this trait.  Dr. Aron’s extensive research has established that about 15-20 percent of the population is highly sensitive and it is a trait that tends to be inherited.

Lest I give the impression that those who are highly sensitive have it all bad (or that others around them suffer as a result of their sensitivity), let me share with you some of the benefits of being an HSP. Those who are highly sensitive tend to be very creative, empathic, insightful, conscientious, reflective and detail-oriented. They are often aware of subtleties in their surroundings that go completely unnoticed by those without this trait; subtleties that may be clues to changes in their health and well-being or the well-being of those around them.

HSPs often have a history of frustrating encounters with medical professionals as they can detect subtle changes in sensation and functioning of their bodies, which the Western medical paradigm is ill-adapted to address. Thus when symptoms have no known cause or diagnosis, patients end out going through a number of tests and medical visits to no avail and may be labeled ‘neurotic’ or told that their condition is ‘psychosomatic’.

Here is where naturopathic and homeopathic care can lend a hand. Those who are highly sensitive tend to respond well to more subtle herbal, nutritional and homeopathic treatments that nourish their nervous systems and gently rebalance the functioning of their body and mind. Dr. Aron states that HSPs tend to have a harder time working mixed shifts or night shifts and recover more slowly from jet lag. Thus it can be said that HSPs also likely have more vulnerable circadian rhythms and could benefit from counsel and support in this area (chronotherapy).

I have greatly enjoyed working with a number of individuals who could be classified as highly sensitive in my practice. I find that in-depth, time-intensive and supportive care (including homeopathy, flower essences and other naturopathic modalities) can be very healing for HSPs. Naturopathic medicine, particularly homeopathy, pays careful attention to the subtle signs, symptoms and observations that patients experience and express. There are over 2,000 homeopathic remedies, many of which can be helpful for HSPs. Below I will share the picture of Phosphorus, a remedy that depicts Dr. Aron’s description of an HSP to a ‘T’:

Phosphorus, a mineral remedy can help someone who fits the following remedy picture: one who is highly impressionable, sensitive to external impressions (light, noise), easily startled, drained from too much social contact, possessing quick perceptions and prone to anxiety and fears (often felt in the pit of the stomach). Phosphorus types are sympathetic to the suffering of others to the point where they may actually feel other people’s pain. They tend to be artistic, creative and imaginative and have strong intense relationships. They generally feel better in the morning, better from sleep and worse from missing a meal and from coffee. There are a number of mental-emotional and physical symptoms which this remedy can effectively treat: anxiety and fears, colds which settle in the chest, a tendency to bleed easily, vertigo, diarrhea and vomiting… Early on, one needing Phosphorus may suffer from fatigue and concerns about their health that can seem out of proportion to their health problem. Later, indifference, apathy and dullness can set in and one can become more withdrawn.

It is beyond the scope of this article to discuss how remedies are selected, prescribed and act to effect healing, but a brief caveat: even the most astute homeopath is limited in prescribing a remedy for their own chronic condition. If you are suffering from a chronic condition and are interested in homeopathy, please seek the care of a qualified naturopath or homeopath and do not self-prescribe!

For a more detailed discussion of the HSP trait, research and case studies on HSPs, the merits and drawbacks of medication for HSPs, psychotherapeutic support and a number of helpful resources and tips, I highly recommend reading Dr. Aron’s book, The Highly Sensitive Person. You may also like to do a brief self-test to see if you are potentially an HSP, you will find this test on Dr. Aron’s website: http://www.hsperson.com/pages/test.htm, along with newsletter archives and a number of other resources.

If you are an HSP, I hope that you can find the support that you need to flourish! And if you are not an HSP, perhaps you have learned something of value to help someone you know, or just to understand HSPs and homeopathy a little more…

If you would like to be notified of future blog posts by email and would like to receive our e-newsletter, sign-up here.

References:

Aron, E. (1996 ). The Highly Sensitive Person. How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You. New York, NY: Broadway Books.

Aron, E. (1996 ). The Highly Sensitive Person. Self-Test. Retrieved from http://www.hsperson.com/pages/test.htm

Elmore, D. (2000). Phosphorus handout (from Vithoulkas, Shore, Kent, Whitmont, Cowperthwaite, Gibson & Nash ). Portland, OR: National College of Natural Medicine.

Categories: Anxiety Disorders, Circadian Rhythms, Homeopathy, Psychology Tags: Behavior, Homeopathy, HSP, Psychotherapy

Antidepressants are on the Rise in the U.S. according to CDC | A Healthy State of Mind

Posted by Mary R. Fry, N.D. on Saturday, October 15, 2011

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the results of their study on Antidepressant Use in The U.S. for persons aged 12 and over from 2005-2008 this month. In their Data Brief , they report that the rate of antidepressant use among all ages has increased nearly 400% since 1988-1994. Some salient features of this report are:

-Females are more likely to be on antidepressants than males

-Greater than 60% of Americans taking antidepressant medication have been taking it for 2 or more years

-Of those taking antidepressants, fewer than one-third of those taking a single antidepressant and less than half of those on multiple antidepressant medications have been have been to a mental health professional in the past year

-Non-Hispanic white persons are more likely to take antidepressant medications than Mexican-American and Hispanic black persons

More information is available in the report. The report does not seek to explain these findings, but a few questions and concerns that it raises for me are:

-Are females more likely to have hormonal imbalances that can yield depressive symptoms?

-If a significant proportion of those taking antidepressant medications have not been to a mental health professional in the past year, are they really getting the ongoing medical and psychiatric evaluations necessary to properly evaluate, treat and manage their depression?

-How much of this antidepressant use could be decreased if other treatments were tried prior to antidepressant medications (exercise, diet, herbal medicine, homeopathy, stress management, sleep hygiene, psychotherapy)?

-Is the difference in use across ethnicity a result of cultural differences in seeking help and/or the type of treatment sought? Or is it more readily explained by differences in access to care?

-Much more on alternative and adjunctive treatments for depression will be covered in future blogs, newsletters and classes. If you are concerned that you may be experiencing depression, it is important to pursue your treatment options medically, psychologically and psychiatrically. Untreated depression can adversely affect one’s health and the health of one’s relationships.

If you would like to be notified of future blog posts by email and would like to receive our e-newsletter, sign-up here.

Pratt LA, Brody DJ, Gu Q. Antidepressant use in persons aged 12 and over: United States, 2005-2008. NCHS data brief, no.76. Hyattsville, MD. National Center for Health Statistics,2011.

Categories: Depression, Psychiatric Medications Tags: Antidepressants, CDC