Press

Wild Food: Using Nutrition and Herbs to Boost Resilience and Mitigate Stress. Co-presented with Michael Tims, Ph.D. Centile Conference-Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, D.C.

Changing Moods, Changing Seasons. Chronotherapeutic approaches for Depression (Seasonal, Bipolar Unipolar). Presented at Multnomah Athletic Club. Portland, OR.

Fry MR, Harrison DA. Psychiatry and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). Presented at Psychiatric Resident Senior Seminar University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Integrative Approaches to Managing Anxiety & Depression. Presented at Integrative Mental Health Care of Oregon (IMHCO) Public Lecture Series. Salem, OR.

Cooking for Health! Webinar presented for the American College of Healthcare Sciences Master Lectures Webinar Series. Press

Teleconference: The Anti-inflammatory Life – American College of Healthcare Sciences.

Integrative medicine-Naturopathic Practice panel. Presented at Family Medicine Residency Seminars Oregon Health & Science University. Portland, OR.

Fry MR, Bulbotz M, Friedman S, Misra S. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Psychiatric patients. Presented at the Psychiatric Grand Rounds of Oregon Health & Science University. Portland, OR.

Events

Event Table at Rethinking Psychiatry Weekend.  Portland, OR.  Community Event Featuring Robert Whitaker (author of Anatomy of an Epidemic:Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America).

Natural Psychiatry Information Booth with S. Goldsmith, M.D. Green Sprouts Organic Baby and Family Festival. Portland, OR.

Publications

Contributor to Seasonal Affective Disorder Chapter in:  

Prevention (Eds.).(2017). The Doctors Book of Natural Healing Remedies. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press.

Fry, M. (2012, Jun. 27). Tipping the Scales in Favor of Collaboration. [Blog]. Mad In America

Fry MR, McFarland BH. Length of stay as a performance measure in substance abuse treatment (Poster Presentation & Abstract). 136th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association. San Diego, CA.

Interviews

Razdan, A. (2016, Apr.). What Your Body is Trying to Tell You, Part 2. Experience Life. [Interviewed for Publication]

Dr. Mary Fry on Seasonal Depression. Healthwatch- KBOO
Radio Interview. Audio file archived at KBOO FM

Read Dr. Fry’s blog.

Welcome to A Healthy State of Mind (AHSOM) Blog

In this blog, we will be regularly posting material to inform our readers about mental health issues and naturopathic approaches to treating mental illness. While our focus is mental health care, it has been our experience that a number of physical health conditions can cause, contribute to, or result from, mental health complaints. Thus you will see postings covering a range of physical and mental health topics along with information on naturopathic modalities. I hope that you find the blog informative. If you know of others who could benefit from it, please let them know.

Mary Fry, ND completed a National Institute of Health post-doctorate in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. She is an Associate Professor in the Nutrition & Integrative Health Department at Maryland University of Integrative Health, lectures and writes on topics of Nutrition, Naturopathic and Functional Medicine and practices in Oregon.

Functional Medicine at A Healthy State of Mind

This post is to update my current and future patients and readers that I recently attended a five-day intensive continuing medical education course offered by The Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM), located in Federal Way, Washington. Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice addresses one of the key issues in healthcare practice today – improving the management of complex, chronic disease. IFM programs utilize the emerging research base to identify effective interventions and to train physicians and other providers to integrate those approaches for the benefit of their patients.

The training that I completed involves understanding the etiology, prevention, and treatment of complex, chronic disease. It is an integrative, science-based healthcare approach that treats illness and promotes wellness by focusing assessment on the biochemically unique aspects of each patient, and then individually tailoring interventions to restore physiological, psychological and structural balance. I have been teaching with some of their tools and approach in my work as an Associate Professor at Maryland University of Integrative Health (Department of Nutrition & Integrative Health) so steeping myself in this training for five days was a wonderful opportunity for both my teaching and practice.

With research estimates of 70-90% of the risk of chronic disease attributable to diet/lifestyle, what you eat, how you exercise, what your spiritual practices are, how much stress you live with (and how you handle it) are all elements that are vital to address. This has been an emphasis in my practice since its inception, and with this training, and work towards becoming a IFM-certified practitioner ongoing, I look forward to honing my ability to deliver comprehensive, cutting-edge and personalized interventions and case management.

Mary Fry, ND completed a National Institute of Health post-doctorate in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. She is an Associate Professor in the Nutrition & Integrative Health Department at Maryland University of Integrative Health, lectures and writes on topics of Nutrition, Naturopathic and Functional Medicine and practices in Oregon.

Common herbal supplements a concern for bipolar disorder?

Mary Fry, ND completed a National Institute of Health post-doctorate in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. She is an Associate Professor in the Nutrition & Integrative Health Department at Maryland University of Integrative Health, lectures and writes on topics of Nutrition, Naturopathic and Functional Medicine and practices in Oregon.

drug-nutrient interactions, ephedra, gingko, ginseng, hypomania, inositol, mania, mood, mood stabilizers, omega-3 fatty acids, rhodiola, self-medication

Circadian Rhythms in the News – Light Therapy for Bipolar Depression & Apps to help with sleep

With more use of devices and longer, darker nights, our circadian rhythms are more vulnerable. Those suffering from bipolar disorder, insomnia or sleep disorders and those who work shifts (shift work disorder) are some of the most affected. Here are a couple of interesting and relevant articles from the news this week:

If you are interested in reading more about Circadian Rhythms and how to optimize yours, see the following blog posts:

and article:

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Mary Fry, ND completed a National Institute of Health post-doctorate in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. She is an Associate Professor in the Nutrition & Integrative Health Department at Maryland University of Integrative Health, lectures and writes on topics of Nutrition, Naturopathic and Functional Medicine and practices in Oregon.

Do you need a multivitamin with minerals? Omega 3 fatty acids? How the nutrition focused physical exam can help to assess your nutrient needs.

Have often have you heard, if you eat a balanced diet, you will obtain all of the nutrients that you need? But what is a balanced diet? And in an age where our food quality is often poorer than that of our ancestors due to loss of nutrients with shipping and storage, modern agricultural practices and lower soil quality (low nutrient soil), how many of us can really derive optimal levels of nutrients from our food? Many leading experts in the integrative medical and nutrition fields suggest that we no longer can rely on our diets alone to obtain sufficient micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) and that modern diets are often low in Omega 3 fatty acids as well. The nutrition focused physical exam can help to determine if we are getting enough (or absorbing enough) nutrients our diet, from a multivitamin with minerals or from Omega 3 fatty acids in our diet/supplements? A number of signs are discussed below with the nutrient insufficiencies that may be causing them. A common example is the use of nutrients for dandruff treatment.

Just to complete our discussion on nutrient assessment, let me provide some context on methods commonly used:

  • Dietary Analysis
  • Laboratory testing
  • Nutrition Focused Physical Exam

Ideally all three methods would be employed and would help in both diagnosing nutrient deficiencies as well as in monitoring one’s response to dietary changes and supplementation. There are a few physical exam findings you can readily detect yourself if you are curious how your nutrient status might be. I will go over these below. Please note that these findings are best considered as part of your overall medical history and with a full exam to narrow down the findings and to rule out serious diseases which may co-occur or contribute to a deficiency of one or more nutrient.

Nails

  • Do you have half moons (lunula) at the base of each of your nails? (If not you may be deficient in protein and/or zinc.)
  • Do you have white spots that are not due to a recent trauma to the nail? (These spots can occur with zinc deficiency.)
  • Do you have ragged cuticles? (This may be due to a deficiency of boron and/or iron.)
  • Do you get swelling, redness and even pus around the nail (without any inciting cause)? (This may be due to a deficiency of zinc, vitamin A and/or vitamin C or from insufficient intake of essential fatty acids.)

Mouth

  • Do you get redness or cracking at the corners of your mouth? (This may be due to deficiencies of B vitamins, iron or zinc.)
  • Do you get canker sores fairly often? (This can result from food allergies.)

Hair

  • Do you suffer from dandruff? (This may be due to a deficiency (or deficiencies) of vitamin A, D, E, K, B vitamins, selenium or calcium in which case supplementation with these nutrients would provide effective dandruff treatment.)
  • If you are a man and have baldness, the type of baldness can give an indication of coronary heart disease risk. (With this information natural health interventions can be directed at minimizing risk and optimizing heart function.)

Skin

  • Do you frequently have little raised bumps on the backs of your arms? (This can be due to vitamin A and/or essential fatty acid deficiency.)

Eyes

  • Do you have dry eyes? (This can be due to Vitamin A or vitamin B2 (riboflavin) deficiency and may be related to blood glucose control.)
  • Do you have decreased night vision? (This can be due to Vitamin A and/or zinc deficiency.)
  • Do you have increased sensitivity to light? (This can be due to zinc deficiency.)

These are just some of the many signs one can detect from a physical exam focused on assessing nutritional health. If an at-home evaluation reveals some possible deficiencies, it is recommended to see a practitioner who is trained to assess nutrient status and who can optimize nutrient status (which involves optimizing diet and supplemental intake and examining digestion and absorption function and other medical signs and history which may impact nutrient status). Consuming a diet that is nutrient-dense and capable of maintaining optimal nutrient status is not as simple as it might have been for our ancestors. Make sure that you are getting the nourishment that you need to function at your best!

If you would like to be notified of future blog posts by email and would like to receive our e-newsletter, sign-up here.

Mary Fry, ND completed a National Institute of Health post-doctorate in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. She is an Associate Professor in the Nutrition & Integrative Health Department at Maryland University of Integrative Health, lectures and writes on topics of Nutrition, Naturopathic and Functional Medicine and practices in Oregon.

Professional Background

Dr. Mary Fry completed her undergraduate Bachelors of Science training in Nutritional Biochemistry from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Following her undergraduate studies, she traveled extensively through South and Southeast Asia, where she had the opportunity to learn about a number of ancient medical systems. Dr. Fry continued her formal , obtaining her degree from the in Portland, Oregon in 2004. At NCNM, she obtained certificates in both Homeopathy and Shiatsu for extensive in-depth didactic and clinical training in each.

Naturopathic physicians (N.D.) complete a four to five year graduate-level program. This program trains naturopaths in basic sciences as a medical doctor (M.D.) is trained in the first two years. However in the latter years of the program, naturopaths study holistic treatment approaches such as nutrition, herbal medicine, homeopathy, physical medicine and lifestyle counseling. Naturopathic physicians take two sets of rigorous and comprehensive professional board exams to become licensed as a primary care physician in the State of Oregon. The National College of Naturopathic Medicine (NCNM), now NUNM (National University of Natural Medicine) was the first naturopathic medical school in North America to become accredited and remains a leading training institution in the field.

Commensurate with naturopathic studies, Dr. Fry began informal studies in psychology in 2000, later traveling abroad to partake in a summer intensive study program at the C.G. Jung Institute of Zurich. Dr. Fry has attended numerous lectures and workshops in psychological studies and is actively involved in analysis. Upon graduating from Naturopathic Medical school, Dr. Fry began clinical practice and worked for a year and a half co-managing the medicinary of NCNM; where she assisted in teaching students how to prepare customized herbal, homeopathic and flower essence formulations.

Dr. Fry has shadowed psychiatrists in inpatient facilities and crisis walk-in clinics and maintains consulting relationships with these colleagues. In 2009, she completed a two-year post-doctoral research fellowship in the department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. This fellowship was funded by the National Institute of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. During her fellowship, she investigated the relationship between circadian rhythms and Bipolar disorder and also investigated the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the treatment of Mental Illness (specifically Anxiety and Depression).

Dr. Fry has presented on Natural Treatments for Mental Illness at Oregon Health & Science University’s Department of Psychiatry Grand Rounds, at the Integrated Mental Health Care of Oregon’s public lecture series, to the University of Washington’s Senior Psychiatry Residents and to physicians at a conference on physician wellness at Georgetown University Medical Center. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Fry is an Associate Professor in the Nutrition and Integrative Health Department at Maryland University of Integrative Health (which collaborates with the Institute of Functional Medicine). There she develops courses and teaches in both the Masters and Doctoral Programs in Clinical Nutrition and delights in the ongoing learning and engagement that she is involved in with students, faculty and staff (spanning pedagogy, online educational design and delivery and functional nutrition and medicine). In her teaching and clinical work, Dr. Fry strives to help her patients, future practitioners she teaches and their patients to reach their full potential, to optimize their health and to promote healing in their families and communities. She is currently pursuing training to become an IFM (Institute for Functional Medicine)-certified practitioner.

Curriculum Vitae

Learn more about Dr. Fry’s presentations, publications, interviews and events.

Naturopathic Mental Health Classes Events Presentations USA | A Healthy State of Mind

No Events

Previous Presentations & Events:

2015

Wild Food: Using Nutrition and Herbs to Boost Resilience and Mitigate Stress. Co-presented with Michael Tims, Ph.D. Centile Conference-Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, D.C.

Slides: http://www.centileconference.org/2015/local/uploads/files/Wild%20Food%20-%20Using%20Nutrition%20and%20Herbs%20to%20Boost%20Resilience%20and%20Mitigate%20Stress%20-%20Tims%20&%20Fry-%20Conference%20Slides.pdf

Handout: http://www.centileconference.org/2015/local/uploads/files/Wild%20Food%20-%20Using%20Nutrition%20and%20Herbs%20to%20Boost%20Resilience%20and%20Mitigate%20Stress%20-%20Tims%20&%20Fry-%20Handout.pdf

2014

Cooking for Health! Webinar presented for the American College of Healthcare Sciences Master Lectures Webinar Series. {Video recording available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9U_9ciTRo0U}

2012

Teleconference: The Anti-inflammatory Life – American College of Healthcare Sciences.

2011

Dr. Mary Fry on Seasonal Depression. Healthwatch- KBOO
Radio Interview. Audio file archived at http://kboo.fm/node/25840

Event Table at Rethinking Psychiatry Weekend.  Portland, OR.  Community Event Featuring Robert Whitaker (author of Anatomy of an Epidemic:Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America).

2010

Changing Moods, Changing Seasons. Chronotherapeutic approaches for Depression (Seasonal, Bipolar Unipolar). Presented at Multnomah Athletic Club. Portland, OR.

Natural Psychiatry Information Booth with S. Goldsmith, M.D. Green Sprouts Organic Baby and Family Festival. Portland, OR.

2009

Fry MR, Harrison DA. Psychiatry and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). Presented at Psychiatric Resident Senior Seminar University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Integrative Approaches to Managing Anxiety & Depression. Presented at Integrative Mental Health Care of Oregon (IMHCO) Public Lecture Series. Salem, OR.

2008

Fry MR, McFarland BH. Length of stay as a performance measure in substance abuse treatment (Poster Presentation & Abstract). 136th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association. San Diego, CA.

Integrative medicine-Naturopathic Practice panel. Presented at Family Medicine Residency Seminars Oregon Health & Science University. Portland, OR.

2007

Fry MR, Bulbotz M, Friedman S, Misra S. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Psychiatric patients. Presented at the Psychiatric Grand Rounds of Oregon Health & Science University. Portland, OR.

Naturopathic Doctor Mary Fry

Dr. Mary Fry completed her undergraduate Bachelors of Science training in Nutritional Biochemistry from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Following her undergraduate studies, she traveled extensively through South and Southeast Asia, where she had the opportunity to learn about a number of ancient medical systems. Dr. Fry continued her formal , obtaining her degree from the in Portland, Oregon in 2004. At NCNM, she obtained certificates training in both Homeopathy and Shiatsu.

Commensurate with naturopathic studies, Dr. Fry began informal studies in psychology in 2000, later traveling abroad to partake in a summer intensive study program at the C.G. Jung Institute of Zurich. Dr. Fry has attended numerous lectures and workshops in psychological studies.

Upon graduating, Dr. Fry began clinical practice and worked for a year and a half co-managing the medicinary of NCNM; where she assisted in teaching students how to prepare customized herbal, homeopathic and flower essence formulations.

Dr. Fry has shadowed psychiatrists in inpatient facilities and crisis walk-in clinics and maintains consulting relationships with these colleagues. In 2009, she completed a two-year post-doctoral research fellowship in the department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. This fellowship was funded by the National Institute of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. During her fellowship, she investigated the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the treatment of Mental Illness, specifically for Anxiety and Depression.

Dr. Fry has presented on Natural Treatments for Mental Illness at Oregon Health & Science University’s Department of Psychiatry Grand Rounds, at the Integrated Mental Health Care of Oregon’s public lecture series, to the University of Washington’s Senior Psychiatry Residents and to physicians at a conference on physican wellness at Georgetown University Medical Center. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Fry is an Associate Professor in the Nutrition and Integrative Health Department at Maryland University of Integrative Health (which collaborates with the Institute of Functional Medicine). There she develops courses and teaches in both the Masters and Doctoral Programs in Clinical Nutrition and delights in the ongoing learning and engagement that she is involved in with students, faculty and staff (spanning pedagogy, online educational development and functional nutrition and medicine).

When she is not teaching, seeing patients and learning more about health and Jungian psychology, Dr. Fry enjoys spending time with her husband and pets (a Maremma sheep dog and a variety of cats) at their home outside of Portland, Oregon, swimming (especially in lakes), camping, hiking, gardening, cooking, antiquing, doing art and sewing.

Naturopathic physicians (N.D.) complete a four to five year graduate-level program. This program trains naturopaths in basic sciences as a medical doctor (M.D.) is trained in the first two years. However in the latter years of the program, naturopaths study holistic treatment approaches such as nutrition, herbal medicine, homeopathy, physical medicine and lifestyle counseling. Naturopathic physicians take two sets of rigorous and comprehensive professional board exams to become licensed as a primary care physician in the State of Oregon.

The National College of Naturopathic Medicine (NCNM), now NUNM (National University of Natural Medicine) was the first naturopathic medical school in North America to become accredited and remains a leading training institution in the field.

Naturopathic Doctor Mary Fry

Dr. Mary Fry completed her undergraduate Bachelors of Science training in Nutritional Biochemistry from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Following her undergraduate studies, she traveled extensively through South and Southeast Asia, where she had the opportunity to learn about a number of ancient medical systems. Dr. Fry continued her formal studies in naturopathic medicine, obtaining her degree from the National College of Naturopathic Medicine (NCNM) in Portland, Oregon in 2004. At NCNM, she completed certification training in Homeopathy and Shiatsu.

Commensurate with naturopathic studies, Dr. Fry began informal studies in psychology in 2000, later traveling abroad to partake in an intensive study program at the C.G. Jung Institute of Zurich. Dr. Fry continues to attend monthly lectures and workshops in psychological studies.

Upon graduating, Dr. Fry began clinical practice and worked for a year and a half co-managing the medicinary of NCNM; where she assisted in teaching students how to prepare customized herbal, homeopathic and flower essence formulations.

Dr. Fry has shadowed psychiatrists in inpatient facilities and crisis walk-in clinics and maintains consulting relationships with these colleagues. Dr. Fry recently completed a two-year post-doctoral research fellowship in the department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. This fellowship was funded by the National Institute of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. During her fellowship, she investigated the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the treatment of Mental Illness, specifically for Anxiety and Depression.

Dr. Fry has presented on Natural Treatments for Mental Illness at Oregon Health & Science University’s Department of Psychiatry Grand Rounds, at the Integrated Mental Health Care of Oregon’s public lecture series and to University of Washington’s Senior Psychiatry Residents. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Fry teaches natural health classes online to students all over the world.

Dr. Fry is a member of:
Integrated Health Care of Oregon (IMHCO)
Oregon Association of Naturopathic Physicians (OANP)
Homeopathic Association of Naturopathic Physicians (HANP)

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